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  • Ron Davidson

“I’ve been in the world of arts all my life”


COURTNEY McCLURE, for The Standard

SCUGOG: “If you treasure those things [art] they’ll accompany you most of your life. If one is missing, it’s like missing a family member.” His hope is that people look at his artwork and find meaning in it for themselves. Gerald Wayne McLeod, 70 years old, is the owner of Gerald Wayne McLeod Art Gallery in Port Perry. Mr. McLeod took over the previously named Camille’s Closet, on Perry Street, a little over two months ago. His studio features his own original artwork. The Gerald Wayne McLeod Art Gallery will be open late on Monday, September 28th and on Monday, October 5th, from 7 to 9 p.m. “Those who like art can come, have a look in the evening and, perhaps, tell me their intentions and if they would like to buy one [a piece],” he said. Everything he is selling within his gallery will also be 50 percent off. People wishing to purchase any of his artwork are asked to bring cash with them, as Mr. McLeod does not accept debit or credit cards. Mr. McLeod is a born member of the Chippewas of Nawash Unceded First Nation, formerly “Cape Croker.” He has been an artist all his life, but he said he does not strictly consider himself an “Indigenous artist.” “I was a teacher all my life,” he stated, explaining that he taught fine art. Now, in 2020, Mr. McLeod considers himself to be semi-retired while still owning his new art gallery, and still able to go back to teaching once in a while. In the past, he said he worked as an art teacher at a few different galleries and worked as a gallery tour guide for 20 years. He has been fortunate to work at the Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Cambridge Library Gallery and the McMichael Canadian Art Collection. Another facility he has showcased his artwork is at Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences in Whitby. “They have a high appreciation for art there, and they have a wonderful gallery.” One of the main reasons he wanted to open his gallery was because he wanted to see what it would be like to run a small, commercial gallery, as opposed to a public one.

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