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Ageism and Seniors

TAMMY ADAMS AND SUSAN FISHER, Special to The Standard

Ageism has been a growing problem in recent years, particularly among older adults. As people live longer and healthier lives, they are increasingly being discriminated against due to their age. This is an issue which needs to be addressed, in order to ensure a more equitable and fair society for all.


The issue of ageism is particularly concerning. Seniors are a vulnerable population, often facing unique challenges due to their age. From financial difficulties to health issues, seniors often find themselves facing more difficulties than their younger counterparts. Ageism can take many forms, from subtle forms of prejudice to outright discrimination. For example, seniors may be passed over for jobs or promotions, due to their age, or they may also be denied access to services or housing, due to their age. In addition, seniors may be the target of derogatory comments or jokes about their age.

Ageism against seniors can have serious consequences. Not only does it cause emotional distress, but it can also lead to financial hardship or even homelessness. In addition, ageism can lead to social isolation, as seniors may feel they are not welcome in certain circles or activities.

Fortunately, there are steps which can be taken to combat ageism.

One approach is to raise awareness of the issue. This can be done through educational campaigns, public forums, and other initiatives. It is also important to create policies to protect seniors from ageism, such as laws which prohibit employers from discriminating against older workers.

In addition, it is important to foster a culture of respect and inclusion. This can be done by encouraging positive interactions and dialogue between people of different ages. The Silver Lights Adult Day Program for Dementia, in Lindsay, has an established Intergenerational Program to help fight ageism in Kawartha Lakes. Just Like Home Daycare comes to visit our clients every other week, to foster a trusting, respectful, and fun relationship between seniors and children.

It is also important to recognize the valuable contributions seniors make to society. Seniors are a valuable part of our communities and wholly deserve to be treated with respect. By raising awareness of the issue, creating policies which protect seniors from discrimination, and fostering a culture of respect and inclusion, we can help create a society which values everyone, regardless of age!

Tammy and Susan run Silver Lights Senior Services; a family-owned and operated seniors’ homecare company, serving the City of Kawartha Lakes, Port Perry and Uxbridge. New Adult Day Program for Dementia is now open in Lindsay. Find them on Facebook and Instagram or visit their website, at www.silverlightsseniorservices.com. To book services, call Tammy, at 705-308-1940, or to register for the Day Program, call Susan, at 705-324- 2911.

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