I have an interest and passion for trees. I would like to share this with Scugog Standard readers and spend some time featuring local champion trees, we may pass by every day and take for granted, how long they have lasted or how large they have grown. 
In this feature I will introduce you to some trees I can’t help but notice, as I walk around town.
Here is how I will feature the candidates. I will categorize them by species first. There are some trees which are naturally the largest on the block, because of how long they live and how large they grow. Certain trees, such as Birch, Apple, and Magnolia can’t compete against naturally large maple, oak or walnut trees. 
Second, I will measure height and canopy width, in metres, and stem diameter, in centimetres, and will use those numbers as points. Stem diameter is a key measurement in arboriculture and forestry. The standard technique is to measure stem width, as Diameter at Breast Height (dbh), which is measured at 1.4 metres above the ground (this is not circumference we are measuring here). If you are trying to measure trees for yourself, you may need to revisit some Grade 9 math books to help you with this, as it is difficult to measure something round with a ruler.
My next champion tree comes from the Pine Grove Cemetery. I repeatedly walked past this guy on my way home from school, about 30 years ago, and its only gotten larger. It is a Norway Spruce (Picea Abies), which was commonly planted a century ago, as a fast growing tree, to quickly reduce windswept farm soil. Farmers in the area often planted them on west and north perimeters as an effective windbreak. 
This tree must have been planted to try and green up a newly started cemetery. They are easily the fastest growing evergreen around. This is not a native tree but thrives in our environment and is recognizable by its droopy branches and large cones. This Norway Spruce has had lots of space and time to become one of the largest I have seen around, with measurements of: Dhb (cm) – 106 cm; Height – 30.9 m; Spread – 17.5 m; for Total points = 154.4
If you have a large tree you know of in Scugog, then email me. I would like to feature many trees and start a list of local Champions. Send email details or photos to eenlingj@gmail.com